A Quitter is Not Always Never a Winner

by Cindy Song, Editor-in-Chief

Quitters never win. That is a phrase I’ve come across numerous times, one that is reflected in countless novels, childhood stories, and even Internet memes. Certainly, a phrase that has been reiterated so often has to have some truthfulness to it. And I’ve experienced this truth when reflecting upon the many times I toiled through a homework assignment even when the clock read 1:00 a.m. Great people only achieve greatness by pushing themselves to success, though that success may be as minor as finishing an essay for English class.

However, where is the line drawn? What happens when the determination to not quit starts to take its toll–on health, on spirit, and on mentality? When is quitting a better option than not quitting? It seems that sometimes, people are so bent on pursuing this single goal in a narrow mindset, that they forget there are possibly better options out there. It all boils down to choices and what really matters to the person.

Last spring, I made the decision to quit my school’s varsity tennis team. I had played on the team for my freshman and sophomore year, although as an alternate (most of the underclassmen were designated as alternates). The reason I quit wasn’t that of anything skill-related; I was actually one of the best players out of the alternates. However, it was the vast amount time and energy I needed to pour into being on the team–long matches that stretched late into the evening, often clashing with my homework time and orchestra rehearsals–that made me wonder whether being on the team was the best decision. Every day after practice, I would come home feeling drained and still have a mountain of homework to do along with repertoire to practice. Yes, I loved the sport and made many amazing friends on the team, but my personal health was put on the line. I simply had too many activities to juggle.

It’s true that I sometimes regret my decision. Whenever I see my ex-teammates dress up for game days, or hear announcements of the team’s recent win, I feel a twinge of bitterness in my heart. When I dig through my closet and find my old tennis uniforms, I feel that same twinge. But as I look at the bigger picture, I realized that it was for the best. After quitting the team this fall season, I could focus more on writing and music and my other hobbies. My passion for tennis still hasn’t faded–I still play whenever I have some free time.

Quitting doesn’t always make you a loser. It can be a symbol of strength, that shows you know how to make the best choices for yourself. Of course, there are times when quitting isn’t the smartest option, when gritting your teeth through the hurdles is the only way through. And that perseverance, that unwavering determination is a quality I respect in people. The difference lies in the bigger picture–there is no set path to being a winner, but it’s up to the competitor to decide which path to take. The road to happiness isn’t a straight line, and neither is the road to failure. There are long and winding roads, and there are also short and easy ones. So take your eyes off the road once in a while and enjoy the scenery around you.

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