A Quitter is Not Always Never a Winner

by Cindy Song, Editor-in-Chief

Quitters never win. That is a phrase I’ve come across numerous times, one that is reflected in countless novels, childhood stories, and even Internet memes. Certainly, a phrase that has been reiterated so often has to have some truthfulness to it. And I’ve experienced this truth when reflecting upon the many times I toiled through a homework assignment even when the clock read 1:00 a.m. Great people only achieve greatness by pushing themselves to success, though that success may be as minor as finishing an essay for English class.

However, where is the line drawn? What happens when the determination to not quit starts to take its toll–on health, on spirit, and on mentality? When is quitting a better option than not quitting? It seems that sometimes, people are so bent on pursuing this single goal in a narrow mindset, that they forget there are possibly better options out there. It all boils down to choices and what really matters to the person.

Last spring, I made the decision to quit my school’s varsity tennis team. I had played on the team for my freshman and sophomore year, although as an alternate (most of the underclassmen were designated as alternates). The reason I quit wasn’t that of anything skill-related; I was actually one of the best players out of the alternates. However, it was the vast amount time and energy I needed to pour into being on the team–long matches that stretched late into the evening, often clashing with my homework time and orchestra rehearsals–that made me wonder whether being on the team was the best decision. Every day after practice, I would come home feeling drained and still have a mountain of homework to do along with repertoire to practice. Yes, I loved the sport and made many amazing friends on the team, but my personal health was put on the line. I simply had too many activities to juggle.

It’s true that I sometimes regret my decision. Whenever I see my ex-teammates dress up for game days, or hear announcements of the team’s recent win, I feel a twinge of bitterness in my heart. When I dig through my closet and find my old tennis uniforms, I feel that same twinge. But as I look at the bigger picture, I realized that it was for the best. After quitting the team this fall season, I could focus more on writing and music and my other hobbies. My passion for tennis still hasn’t faded–I still play whenever I have some free time.

Quitting doesn’t always make you a loser. It can be a symbol of strength, that shows you know how to make the best choices for yourself. Of course, there are times when quitting isn’t the smartest option, when gritting your teeth through the hurdles is the only way through. And that perseverance, that unwavering determination is a quality I respect in people. The difference lies in the bigger picture–there is no set path to being a winner, but it’s up to the competitor to decide which path to take. The road to happiness isn’t a straight line, and neither is the road to failure. There are long and winding roads, and there are also short and easy ones. So take your eyes off the road once in a while and enjoy the scenery around you.

Minute: Pursuit of Happiness & Writing Till the Last Breath

by Kinzey McHale, Prose Editor

I’ve been asked one question too many times over my short life: what do you think you’ll do in life?

To be truthful, I have no set plan for my life. My main goal is to earn my GED and then focus on developing myself. Learning what makes me happy. As of now, that is all my plan contains. No college ideas, no career ideas, no detailed life plan, no rush. I’m living as I go, and learning as I experience new things. I’ve had tremendous pressure on me, from my mom primarily, to excel in school and begin college this fall. My “plan” was just to follow her plan. Unfortunately, that plan fell through in late May of this year. My mom passed away from a heart attack.

Everything happened so quickly. After going to the hospital and saying goodbye to her still body, my little brother and I moved in with our older brother. It all went down over the course of a few hours, from the first signs of her heart attack to seeing her in the hospital. It was immediate and startling having to live with someone we haven’t lived with in years, as well as his girlfriend of two years. I hadn’t known her very well, but I knew my brother and I knew that whoever he chose to live with was a good person. So, we accepted the move to his townhouse in Laurel, Maryland.

It’s been almost two months since my younger brother and I were completely uprooted from our lives in Stevensville, Maryland. We’ve both adjusted fairly well, and are closer than ever before with our older brother and his girlfriend. I’ve gotten closer with her and consider her family, call her my “second sister.” My older brother, who is in his mid-twenties, has shown me business tricks and helped me further my interests. Recently, my laptop broke and he let me use the desktop for a while, until I started to want to write when he was working on it. My “second sister” offered her old laptop, the laptop on which I’m currently writing this piece. That kind gesture has allowed me to continue an incredibly therapeutic hobby.

My mom taught me how to write when I was six years old, citing it a necessary skill in life. Although I knew how to write, I didn’t know how to actually create art. I’ve helped co-workers design event posters, edit short stories, and assist with speeches. The ability to bind letters at a moment’s notice has strengthened numerous work relationships, attracting attention to me and my skill set. Above all the other things she showed me, she taught me how to weave life with words.

My love for reading and writing was nurtured from age six, continuing well into my teens. That’s one reason I’ve been accepted as Minute’s new Prose Editor! I always hoped that having an insatiable appetite for writing would bring me amazing opportunities like this. My hope is to eventually be a fully-employed writer for a magazine publication, whether it be a tiny advice column or a travel spread. Somewhere I can spread what I’ve learned to others, offer a place people can go to for fresh thoughts. I’ll work as hard as I can for a career in which writing is necessary, no matter how much it takes from me.

As long as I have a pen and paper—or in most cases, a laptop—I’ll be writing until my last breath.